5 Everyday Habits to Fight Internet Addiction

Recently, I talked about the prevalence—and damage—of internet addiction in our society. Over-stimulation of our minds on a daily, even hourly basis can act as a major handicap to our creativity and mental focus. If we want to make an impact with our art, it’s important that we address this problem.

Everyday Habits

Lately, my husband and I have been taking steps to fight our own social media addictions. It’s just so easy to click over to Facebook—or worse, leave the tab open while attempting to work on other things. It’s frustrating and depressing to reach the end of the day, only to look back and realize that you did nothing but waste time, so today I want to talk about five simple, everyday habits you can employ to help fight internet addiction in your own life.

Dear Creative: Stop Beating Yourself Up for Being “Normal”

Dear Creative,

If you’re anything like me, nothing has ever sounded as dull as simply “being normal”. Having a normal job and doing normal things like normal people. It turns you off because, deep down, you know you were made for more than that. You have a purpose, and “normalcy” is your enemy—or is it?

being-normal

I just want to take a minute to say something that should be pretty obvious, but for some reason isn’t: People are not normal. People are complex, vibrant, mysterious, and deep—sometimes even beyond their own realization. You are one of those people. But unique people like you and I sometimes end up doing “normal things”—and we beat ourselves up for it.

The Importance of “No”

We live in a world that is constantly pushing for more—for us to do more, give more, or be more. As high achievers, this is a natural tendency, and a great trait. Aspiring to do and achieve your best is not something to be ashamed of, but today I want to talk about one little word that’s sometimes so hard for us to say: No.

importance-no

In 2016, my focus was on generosity. I wanted to give more freely to more people. Now don’t get me wrong—generosity is a phenomenal trait with many benefits, and one I think we should all learn to cultivate. However, I made one mistake: I never said no.

3 Ways to Begin Cultivating a Generous Mindset

Generous people make the greatest impact. It’s no secret, really; just a plain, simple fact. The more you give, the more lives you are able to touch. People who are characterized by an open hand are some of the most well-respected and successful people in society.

generous-mindset

One of my goals is to begin cultivating a more generous mindset. I want to give freely, no strings attached. Generosity is one of the most attractive and outstanding traits a person can develop.

To the Weary

I know how it is. You’re tired. Life has thrown you under the bus and you’re defeated. Burnt out. How can you ever keep up when you’ve fallen this far behind? It’s like you’re waiting for the dust to settle but instead, it becomes a storm; a vicious howl around you. And you just can’t. Listen up, hero—I get it. You are weary.

weary

Weariness. We’ve all felt it, haven’t we? Yet it’s not so easy to describe, because “I’m tired” implies you’ll be okay with sleep. But you won’t. Because weariness is beyond that; it’s like inspiration—the very breath of your soul—is being sucked from your lungs, and you don’t know how to get it back. How do I know? Well, I’ve been there, too. Right now, in fact.

Dear Creative: Stop Beating Yourself Up for Being “Normal”

Dear Creative,

If you’re anything like me, nothing has ever sounded as dull as simply “being normal”. Having a normal job and doing normal things like normal people. It turns you off because, deep down, you know you were made for more than that. You have a purpose, and “normalcy” is your enemy—or is it?

being-normal

I just want to take a minute to say something that should be pretty obvious, but for some reason isn’t: People are not normal. People are complex, vibrant, mysterious, and deep—sometimes even beyond their own realization. You are one of those people. But unique people like you and I sometimes end up doing “normal things”—and we beat ourselves up for it.