Dear Creative: Stop Beating Yourself Up for Being Normal

Dear Creative,

If you’re anything like me, nothing has ever sounded as dull as simply “being normal.” Having a normal job and doing normal things like normal people. It turns you off because, deep down, you know you were made for more than that. You have a purpose, and “normalcy” is your enemy—or is it?

I just want to take a minute to say something that should be pretty obvious, but for some reason isn’t: People are not normal. People are complex, vibrant, mysterious, and deep—often beyond even their own realization. You are one of those people. But unique people like you and I sometimes find ourselves doing “normal things”—and we beat ourselves up for it.

3 Ways “Hustle” May be Hurting Your Creativity

We’ve all heard it proclaimed from Facebook to Instagram to Pinterest: “Hustle, hustle, hustle!” Pithy quotes from overly-ambitious bloggers tell you that “Good things come to those who hustle!” They warn you against “nibbling on mediocrity” because it’s better to choke on greatness.

Now before you write this off as an excuse to laze around in the comfort of mediocrity, let the record show: I believe in hard work. I’m all about dedication and achieving excellence. But this idea of hustle—of constant motion—has to go if we are to achieve anything beyond absolute burnout.

3 Things Minimalism is Not

I’ve talked before about how incorporating minimalism into your lifestyle can help enhance your creativity. Plus, it can have a positive effect on your overall mental well-being. And who wouldn’t want that?

minimalism-is-not

However, the concept of “minimalism”, as pertaining to lifestyle, is widely interpreted to be merely stylistic, and even frivolous. Quite the opposite of what true minimalists aim to achieve: freedom and mental clarity. So today, I want to dig a little deeper into what minimalism is—and more specifically—what it is not.

4 Reasons I Decided to Try Bullet Journaling

I’m not a journaler. I’m not good at it, and I feel like I never have enough time to sit down and write thoughtfully about my day. Usually, I prefer to spend my time on other things (like writing blog posts and stories. You know, stuff like that). Maybe you feel the same.

bullet-journaling

I’d read about the benefits of keeping a journal, and tried off and on to do it, but it never stuck. Then I stumbled across the concept of Bullet Journaling. I’ll be honest—at first this concept intimidated me. It looked overwhelmingly complicated, and I wasn’t sure I’d be able to keep up with it. But I decided to give it a shot, and so far, I’m loving it—and I’ll tell you why.

5 Everyday Habits to Fight Internet Addiction

Recently, I talked about the prevalence—and damage—of internet addiction in our society. Over-stimulation of our minds on a daily, even hourly basis can act as a major handicap to our creativity and mental focus. If we want to make an impact with our art, it’s important that we address this problem.

Everyday Habits

Lately, my husband and I have been taking steps to fight our own social media addictions. It’s just so easy to click over to Facebook—or worse, leave the tab open while attempting to work on other things. It’s frustrating and depressing to reach the end of the day, only to look back and realize that you did nothing but waste time, so today I want to talk about five simple, everyday habits you can employ to help fight internet addiction in your own life.

Simplicity is Not about Having Less

The word “simplicity” is a hot topic right now. It’s trendy. If you’re a minimalist, you’re part of the cool crowd, and you’re doing things right. And this is nothing against minimalists—I tend to be one myself, and I think it’s great—but if we define simplicity as synonymous with minimalistic, we’re missing the point.

having-less

Simplicity is not a “trend” to be attached to one specific “lifestyle”. It’s not about having less, or religiously shunning any type of privilege or convenience. It’s not a list of do’s and don’ts. It’s a lot simpler than that—really.

Letting Go: The Practice of Choosing Happiness

We talk often of choosing happiness. Countless blog articles, podcasts, and other resources exist on the subject, but what does choosing happiness really look like? How can you actually do it?

letting-go

It sounds so easy: Just choose to be happy! Just choose. That’s it. No further explanation—as if merely deciding to be happy is all it takes. It’s no wonder we get frustrated when it doesn’t work out like that—at least, not for long.